Treanor Architects Blog/News

Shoptalk: Knob-and-Tube

2015-04-22 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
knob-and-tube wiring

Definition:
Single-insulated copper conductors running within wall or ceiling cavities, passing through joist and stud drill-holes via protective porcelain insulating tubes, and supported along their length by nailed-down porcelain knob insulators; early standardized method of electrical wiring. (Source: Knob-and-tube wiring. Wikipedia. Accessed 2015.)

Examples:
Knob-and-tube wiring (K&T), was commonly used in North America for interior wiring from the 1880s to the 1930s. While other methods of interior wiring were available during this time, K&T was often the preferred method as it was the most affordable. The method of wiring used two wires, supply (hot) and return (neutral) that had to be spaced at least three inches apart except where the wires connected to a box or fixture. At these connections the wires were covered with a loom, a woven flexible insulating sleeve, to provide additional protection to the insulated copper conductors. Porcelain knobs supported the wires between joists, suspending them in open air to allow heat to dissipate and preventing stress from accumulating on spliced connections.

Figure of K&T WiringSource: Electric Wiring and Lighting ...: Part I – Electric Wiring, Page 14, Charles Edwin Knox & George Carl Shaad, American School of Correspondence, 1913.

K&T was displaced as the method of choice from interior wiring systems because of the high cost of installation compared with the use of power cables, which combined both power conductors of a circuit in one run (and later included grounding conductors).

Knob and tube wiring has been found in many Treanor projects such as The Historic Windsor Hotel in Garden City, Kan., the Heaton Building in Norton, Kan.

K&T at Winsor HotelKnob-and-tube wiring was used at the Windsor Hotel. This picture shows wiring added sometime after historic construction penetrating a historic transom window above a door.

Multiple Wiring PhasesMultiple phases of electrical wire – from knob-and-tube to armored cable “BX” to insulated stranded wire - have been installed at the Heaton Building.

K&T wiring at Heaton BuildingExposed/vulnerable ceramic knobs and wires in the attic of the Heaton Building.

Three Immediate Openings with Treanor Preservation

2015-04-10 Posted By: Patty Weaver

The Treanor Architects Preservation Studio works with grand old architecture, but these are brand new positions! We are recruiting candidates for the following career opportunities:

Preservation Architect
Topeka, KS

  • Candidates must hold an accredited degree in architecture; college course work &/or professional experience with historic preservation is desired.
  • Ideal candidates will:
    • have 5-7 years of experience that includes project design, rehabilitation projects, heritage conservation research, planning and reporting, and materials conservation,
    • be licensed or actively seeking licensure,
    • be proficient with Revit; previous experience with Point Cloud and 3D modeling a plus,
    • and have a willingness and ability to travel in service of our clients’ needs.
 

2 Full-Time Designers
Topeka, KS / Kansas City, MO

  • Ideal candidates will:
    • hold an accredited degree in architecture; college course work &/or professional experience with historic preservation is desired,
    • 1-4 years of experience that includes project design, rehabilitation projects, heritage conservation research, planning and reporting, and materials conservation, actively seeking licensure,
    • proficient with Revit; previous experience with Point Cloud and 3D modeling a plus, and
    • a willingness and ability to travel in service of our clients’ needs.

If you would like to join this dynamic and growing team, e-mail Amy Bellerive, director of Human Resources, with your resume and contact information at abellerive@treanorarchitects.com for consideration.

Making the best of the past a part of the future!Making the best of the past a part of the future!

Shoptalk: Anthemion

2015-03-18 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
anthemion

Definition:
Design consisting of a number of radiating petals developed by the ancient Greeks derived from the Egyptian and Asiatic form known as the honeysuckle or lotus palmette; used as a decorative finish in architecture; single-palmette for appears on decorative pedestals, roof or cornice elements; repeating pattern of alternating lotus and palmette typically appears on cornice molding. (Source: Anthemion. Encyclopedia Britannica. 2013.)

Examples:
The anthemion is used in architectural ornamentation from ancient architecture to more recent classic revivals like in the Masonic Grand Lodge Building in Topeka, Kan., built in 1916. The Masonic Grand Lodge Building utilizes anthemion ornamentation on its copper roof cornice.

Carved Anthemion Ornament DrawingAnthemion (carved) ornament detail drawing by James Ward, 1897. (Source: Anthemion (Carved), from Apollo Epicurius. Look and Learn History Picture Library. 2010.)

Kansas Statehouse Oculus TopDiagram of classic architectural elements and features. (Source: Lecture Notes, Mediterranean Civilizations, ca. 2000 BC-AD 500. The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. 2009.)

Masonic Grand Lodge DrawingHistoric drawing of the south façade of the Masonic Grand Lodge Building by notable architect Edward L. Tilton c. 1916.

Masonic Grand Lodge BuildingSouth facade of the Masonic Grand Lodge Building, 2014.

Masonic Grand Lodge Roof CorniceAnthemion design on the Masonic Grand Lodge Building’s historic copper roof cornice, 2014.

Immediate Openings for Healthcare Architect & Designer

2015-03-06 Posted By: Jac Samp

Treanor Architects is adding two – yes two – new positions to our Healthcare studio based out of our Kansas City, Missouri office.  If you would like to join this dynamic and growing team, e-mail Amy Bellerive, director of Human Resources, with your resume and contact information at abellerive@treanorarchitects.com for consideration.   

                      1 full-time Project Architect

  • Ideal candidates will be registered architects with 7-10 years of experience
  • Experience in Healthcare programming and design required. 
  • A passion for working collaboratively with clients to solve unique and complex challenges
  • Experience in the development of proposals
  • Ability to mentor young design professionals
  • Proficient in Revit, Sketch Up, etc.
  • A willingness and ability to travel in service of our clients’ needs

                               1 full-time Designer

  • Candidates must hold an accredited degree in Architecture
  • 2-4 years of practical experience
  • Revit and document production experience required
  • Experience in healthcare design not required
  • A willingness and ability to travel in service of our clients’ needs

 

 

Like wearing scrubs? Building baseball caps out of cans for charity? Designing for healthcare? Say hello today!Like wearing scrubs? Building baseball caps out of cans for charity? Designing for healthcare? Say hello today!

Shoptalk: Oculus

2015-03-05 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
oculus

Definition:
a circular opening at the top of a dome or in a wall; also known as an œil de boeuf from the French, or simply a "bull's-eye"; From Latin oculus meaning eye

Examples: An oculus can be enclosed with a glass window or open to the elements. It can be left open or be closed using a clypeus, a round, shield-like covering. (Oculus. Gill, N.S., About Education.) One example of the open form of the oculus is located at the top of the Kansas Statehouse inner dome.

Kansas Statehouse Oculus From AboveAbove is a view of the top side of inner dome/oculus prior to restoration. Note the plywood infill within oculus.

Kansas Statehouse Oculus TopA view of the bottom side of the inner dome/oculus during initial copper restoration. Note the plywood infill within oculus.

Kansas Statehouse Oculus From BelowA view of the bottom side of the at inner dome/oculus after copper restoration. Note the unfinished steel framework for the original historic chandelier that was removed in 1942 as a donation for a scrap metal drive during World War II.

Kansas Statehouse Oculus AfterKansas Statehouse’s inner dome/oculus after restoration and installation of recreated historic chandelier.

Immediate Opening with Treanor Preservation

2015-03-03 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Treanor Architects is actively seeking a full-time preservation architect to join our Topeka, Kan. team.  If you have a creative, energetic nature, and a passion for working with historic buildings, you may be the candidate we are looking for!  Requirements needed for the position include:

  • accredited degree in architecture; college course work &/or professional experience with historic preservation desired
  • 5-7 years of experience that includes project design, rehabilitation projects, heritage conservation research, planning and reporting, and materials conservation
  • licensed or actively seeking licensure
  • proficient with Revit; previous experience with Point Cloud and 3D modeling a plus, and 
  • a willingness and ability to travel in service of our clients’ needs

If this describes you, email Amy Bellerive, director of Human Resources, with your resume and contact information at abellerive@treanorarchitects.com.

Learn more about Treanor Preservation.

Making the best of the past a part of the future!Making the best of the past a part of the future!

Shoptalk: Acetylene Generator

2015-02-18 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
acetylene generator

Definition:
self-contained device that generates acetylene gas, by mixing calcium carbide and water, to be burned for light and heat (Sources: 1. Gas Lighting – Beyond the City, Old House Web. 2. Acetylene: The Principles of its Generation and Use, F.H. Leeds & W.J. Atkinson Butterfield, 1903.)

Examples: Coal gas was commonly used in large cities to provide light and heat in the 19th century. In fact, Baltimore, Maryland installed the first gas streetlight system in the United States in 1816. The first private residence in the U.S. to use gas for lighting was in Philadelphia.

During that time it wasn’t easy or cost effective to supply rural, isolated areas with coal gas for light and heat. Fortunately for those in rural areas, acetylene was rediscovered in the 1860s and inventors in the 1890s developed acetylene generators. These generators could be placed in commercial buildings or houses with supply lines running from the generators to appliances such as acetylene gas lamps.

Acetylene generator diagrams
Acetylene generators generally used one of two methods as diagramed below. Figure 209 shows the carbide added to water method and figure 2010 shows the water added to carbide method. (Source: Mechanics of the Household, Page 298, E.S. Keene, 1918.)

Section of home using acetylene generator
Figure 212 shows a home with a acetylene generator feeding heating as well as both indoor and outdoor lighting. (Source: Mechanics of the Household, Page 301, E.S. Keene, 1918.)

 

 

Shoptalk: Sleeping Porch

2015-02-04 Posted By: Patty Weaver

Shoptalk—deciphering architectural and historic preservation jargon one word at a time!

Term:
sleeping porch

Definition:
Predominantly found in the South, these porches were popular in early 20th-century architectural styles. The porches were often enclosed or screened and were used for sleeping during the warm summer months before the dawn of air conditioning. Summer sleeping porches are typically located on the second floor above open-air porches on the north or east sides of the house to limit exposure to the setting sun. They often have two to three walls of windows to maximize air flow. (Source: McAlester, Virginia & Lee. A Field Guide to American Houses. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1984, pg. 332.)

Sleeping porch in Kansas City, MissouriSleeping porch shown on left over the open lower-level porch at 801 Huntington Road, Kansas City, MO. (Source: Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri.)

Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic SitePhotograph of the sleeping porch in the main house of the Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, Hyde Park, New York, USA. Photo by Rolf Müller.

2015 Canstruction - Celebrating our KC Royals!

2015-01-13 Posted By: Jac Samp

We believe in SLUGGING OUT HUNGER!

How far will we go for preservation?

2014-12-19 Posted By: Patty Weaver

To the border and beyond! Well, almost to the border. Todd Renyer and Ian Pitts, both of Treanor Preservation, and Matt Murphy, Treanor Civil, traveled to southwestern Texas this week. The trip was centered around completing condition assessments of Texas Parks & Wildlife facilities at Balmorhea State Park and Black Gap Wildlife Management Area.

L-R: Ian Pitts, Todd Renyer and Matt Murphy taking a photo break at the Shurley House located at the Black Gap Wildlife Management Area in Alpine, Texas.L-R: Ian Pitts, Todd Renyer and Matt Murphy taking a photo break at the Shurley House located at the Black Gap Wildlife Management Area in Alpine, Texas.
L-R: Todd Renyer and Ian Pitts before starting work at the San Solomon Springs Motor Court at Balmorhea State Park in Toyahvale, Texas.L-R: Todd Renyer and Ian Pitts before starting work at the San Solomon Springs Motor Court at Balmorhea State Park in Toyahvale, Texas.
L-R: Matt Murphy and Ian Pitts standing close to the border, but not close enough to cross.L-R: Matt Murphy and Ian Pitts standing close to the border, but not close enough to cross.